“Publicness” in Contemporary Securities Regulation after the JOBS Act — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

Small business of-interest, need-to-know and news-to-watch — SEC public versus private.

Excerpt:  In our article “Publicness” in Contemporary Securities Regulation after the JOBS Act, forthcoming in the Georgetown Law Journal, we focus on the ideologically-charged question of when a private enterprise should be forced to take on public status, an extraordinarily significant change in its legal obligations and freedom to maneuver. The JOBS Act, which became law in April 2012, makes the first change in almost a half century in the criteria specified for companies that must meet public obligations under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Congress increased the “private space” by raising the 500 shareholder threshold to 2000 (so long as no more than 499 of those are not “accredited investors”) and permitting most new IPO companies to skip a host of regulatory obligations during their first five years as a public company.

Read full article via “Publicness” in Contemporary Securities Regulation after the JOBS Act — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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2 responses to ““Publicness” in Contemporary Securities Regulation after the JOBS Act — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

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