Derivatives Rules under the Dodd-Frank Act Affecting End-Users — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

Small business of-interest and need-to-know.

Excerpt: Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) provides for new Federal regulation of the swaps market, and, when fully implemented, is expected to make fundamental changes in the way the swaps market operates. Title VII seeks to reduce systemic risk, increase transparency and improve efficiency in the swaps market by requiring centralized clearing and exchange trading of swaps as well as real-time and regulatory reporting of swap transactions. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) will regulate most swaps on interest rates, commodities and currencies and the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC,” together with the CFTC, the “Commissions”) will regulate swaps, including equity and credit default swaps, on single securities and narrow-based securities indices. The term “swap” is defined broadly in the Dodd-Frank Act, and includes certain foreign exchange transactions, such as non-deliverable foreign currency forwards, that may not be characterized as swaps for other purposes.

Read full article via Derivatives Rules under the Dodd-Frank Act Affecting End-Users — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

Advertisements

Comments Off on Derivatives Rules under the Dodd-Frank Act Affecting End-Users — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

Filed under Small Business

Comments are closed.