New Statesman – Your Brain on Pseudoscience: The Rise of Popular Neurobollocks

Interesting read — author cites several examples and includes the warning of popular neuroscience in business can be nothing more than scams.  (In other words, we now are hearing from the other side).   I think there is a  truth in what he says, but from experience I am not ready to throw the “baby out with the bathwater”.   There is far too much documented success in the studies of “why we do what we do” and “why we are who we are” ,  and I have found this to be helpful in leadership, training and management.

Excerpt:  An intellectual pestilence is upon us. Shop shelves groan with books purporting to explain, through snazzy brain-imaging studies, not only how thoughts and emotions function, but how politics and religion work, and what the correct answers are to age-old philosophical controversies. The dazzling real achievements of brain research are routinely pressed into service for questions they were never designed to answer. This is the plague of neuroscientism – aka neurobabble, neurobollocks, or neurotrash – and it’s everywhere.

Read full article via New Statesman – Your brain on pseudoscience: the rise of popular neurobollocks.  From New Statesman

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