Category Archives: Small Business

Most Innovative Companies In The World

Small business of-interest takeaways.   Innovation and R&D spending.

Excerpt:  Barry Jaruzelski, the Booz senior partner who put the report together, says that over the past eight years, they’ve found “no statistically significant relationship between how much you spend on R&D and how you perform over an extended period of time.”

Read introduction and see 11 slides via Most Innovative Companies In The World – Business Insider.

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BYOD: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (Infographic)

byod-biztech-infographic-750
Find more amazing infographics on NerdGraph Infographics

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Filed under Business Intelligence, IT, Data Management, Metrics, Cloud & Mobile, Infographic, Small Business

10 New Posts & 1 New Infographic Today, 10.29.12 Small Business News to Use

HOME page highlights today include:
– mobile to be big this holiday season — build apps and use the right channel
– big guys are setting up same day delivery — major competition
– if you are reseller, check out court case pending — impact could be great
– recognize when goals change your market — ROI metrics need to change also
– one of my favorites (of course) leadership brain tools
– update on whistleblower status from Harvard Law
– plus even more as usual — explore today and then explore on all of the site!

INFOGRAPHICS page today includes one new:
Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) | The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Enjoy!

A message from us:  We hope all of our relatives, friends and colleagues on the East Coast stay safe tonight.  The latest news is that “Sandy” was downgraded from hurricane to storm — still packing walloping winds and rain though.

Beverly

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Filed under Business Blog & Miscellaneous, Infographic, Small Business

Supreme Court Ruling Threatens Resellers

As the introduction states, if you resell goods, pay attention to the outcome of this case.  It could have a major impact on your business.

Excerpt:  If you’re a small business owner handling re-sold goods, you may want to pay attention to what happens in the Supreme Court this week.

Read full article via Supreme Court Ruling Threatens Resellers | Inc.com.

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Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Provision and Court’s Broad Interpretation — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

Small business need-to-know.

Excerpt:  Under Judge Underhill’s ruling, whistleblower protection extends to all individuals who report or disclose, either internally or to the SEC, alleged violations that are “required or protected” under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, 18 U.S.C. § 1513(e), or any other law, rule, or regulation subject to the jurisdiction of the SEC. The Kramer ruling could embolden corporate employees to claim whistleblower protection for a broad range of activities.

Read full article  via Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Provision and Court’s Broad Interpretation — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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The Shareholder Base and Payout Policy — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

Small business of-interest and need-to-know.

Excerpt:  …… we examine the relation between the shareholder base and payout policy. Finance practitioners acknowledge that having a broad shareholder base is an important factor for many corporate decisions. For example, in a recent study of firm payout policy, Brav, Graham, Harvey, and Michaely (2005) survey financial executives and conclude that “With respect to payout policy, the rules of the game include … [to] have a broad and diverse investor base…” Despite the apparent importance of the shareholder base there is little academic evidence relating shareholder base to corporate decisions. In this paper we investigate the effect of the shareholder base on the level and method of payout.

Read full article via The Shareholder Base and Payout Policy — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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5 New Posts, 2 New Guest Posts & 3 New Infographics Today, 10.26.12 Small Business News to Use

HOME page highlights today include:
– can business embed IT — good read.
– financial markets effect on economic decisions.
– a look at the data management we need yet to conquer.
– the public versus private boundaries in capital
– plus even more today as usual — do explore current and archives.

GUEST POST (1) page has a new article today (good read):
A Small Business Survival Guide The First Three Years, by Sarah Levy

GUEST POST (2) page has a new article today (good read):
‘Micro’ Management for ‘Macro’ Benefits, by James Harrison

 INFOGRAPHICS page has three new infographics today, don’t miss these:
Image Sizing Cheat Sheet for Social Media   
10 of the Spookiest Cyber Attacks in 2012
– The Conversion Rate Optimization Report 2012

Enjoy all of these and then explore for even more!

Everyone everywhere have a great weekend!

Beverly

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Filed under Business Blog & Miscellaneous, Infographic, Small Business

The Feedback Effect: How the Financial Markets Affect Decisions in the ‘Real Economy’ – Knowledge@Australian School of Business

Small business need-to-know.  The study shows why measurements at different times have different weight and how to really use the information for specific purpose

Excerpt: … there is much more to it than that, according to a new study by two Wharton faculty members and one former one. Their paper, “The Real Effects of Financial Markets,” explores the subtle relationships between the share price, the company’s health, and decisions made by its executives and other players, such as lenders, investors, customers, directors, employees and regulators. The study, a survey of research on the topic, finds that the financial markets, where stocks, bonds and other securities are traded, serve a critical “informational role” that affects decisions in the “real economy” composed of companies.

Read full article via The Feedback Effect: How the Financial Markets Affect Decisions in the ‘Real Economy’ – Knowledge@Australian School of Business.

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Redrawing the Public-Private Boundaries in Entrepreneurial Capital-Raising — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

Small business of-interest and need-to-know.

Excerpt:  In our article, Redrawing the Public-Private Boundaries in Entrepreneurial Capital Raising, we examine what the JOBS Act (enacted earlier this year) tells us about the division between the public and private spheres in securities regulation. On its face the JOBS Act broadly expands the private realm as defined by our national securities laws. It provides two new exemptions from registration (crowdfunding and Regulation A+) and will broadly expand the reach of the most-used existing exemption from registration by removing the ban on general solicitation from exempt offerings made pursuant to Rule 506, provided they are made only to accredited investor. Yet legislative reform has done little to shore up the shaky foundation of existing theory that guides how we have thought about dividing public from private obligations in this area of the law.

Read full article via Redrawing the Public-Private Boundaries in Entrepreneurial Capital-Raising — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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Filed under Entrepreneurs & Startups, Small Business

‘Micro’ Management for ‘Macro’ Benefits

Guest Post by James Harrison

Every business-owner faces the challenge of building and managing a team. Half the battle is won, once you find the right people for your team. It becomes completely your responsibility to manage your team once you find the right people. There are several techniques that can help you manage your team in the best possible manner.

Micromanagement is one such team management technique that helps employers observe and supervise their team. It can also be referred to as the ‘micro’ aspect of management. It is all about day-to-day management that helps in keeping the team on track. Some advantages of implementing micromanagement in your business include:

1.      Development Of Employee Skills: Once you’re observing and controlling certain aspects of your employees’ jobs, you can help them develop particular skills and utilize their potential to the fullest.

2.      Promote Accountability Within The Team: You can easily instill a sense of responsibility within the team and help in building mutual trust and respect.

3.      Measure Progress: Micromanagement of your team can help you measure the progress of your team as a whole and help reap greater profits too.

4.      Set Up Deadlines And Stay Connected With Projects: Once you’re micromanaging your employees, you can remain aware of individual statuses of projects. This helps you remain connected with your project status. You can even have changes administered at initial levels and even keep deadlines for your projects.

5.      Bond With Employees: Micromanagement can also help you bond with your employees in a better way. You can help them understand their own career aspirations. Using micromanagement in the right way can also help you ascertain that your team is happy and fully utilized.

Micromanagement can hence, help you enhance productivity of the team as a whole. It is a mutually beneficent way of managing the team, where the employees can understand their roles and capabilities in the best possible manner.

Micromanagement is known to help managers forge extremely strong and good bonds with their employees. Some of these relationships have been so strong that these employees have gone out of their ways to assist their employers during bad times, business moves and some of them have even helped businesses thrive during the difficult economic times.

When micromanagement becomes mismanagement?
Sometimes, micro-managers may supervise beyond a reasonable point. This can have detrimental effects on employee morale, and make employees less productive. It can even make it harder for you to do your own job, if you spend too much time supervising your own team. Studies by Journal of Experimental Psychology have shown that being continuously watched over by managers can distract workers and hinder their working memory too. It can also divert their attention from the relevant task s at hand in such a way that they are unable to complete their tasks.

How to use micromanagement to your advantage?
Most people remain apprehensive about holding employees accountable to their assigned tasks without micromanaging. You can simply not avoid micromanaging your employees. It is however, possible to micromanage your employees without hindering their progress and productivity. Some points to remember while micromanaging your employees are:

1.      Customize Individual Jobs: Research has shown that most employees with diverse jobs have always benefited from personalization. This helped most employees see themselves playing an important role in the organization. It is a great motivation for anybody, and helps enhance productivity. Remember to avoid controlling all the aspects of your employee’s job, and make it a point to accredit the employee for good work with timely appreciation.

2.      Do Not Empower People: Instead of empowering your employees, foster autonomy by adding to the total amount of power available to do work. Recognize and support every individual’s discretion and control in deciding how to do the work. By helping your employees take up individual ownership of their jobs, you can ensure that they feel more stimulated and engaged. This will also help ensure that your employees feel less suffocated by managerial attention.

Make sure you work on your own time allocation. Having a different approach to juggling between leadership, production and administrative duties will help you deliver the best results and exalted productivity.

Author Bio:   James Harrison works as freelance writer. He regularly contributes write ups to business websites and blogs with most of his writings based on tips for small business setups, office moves and marketing techniques. In his free time he plays sports mainly soccer and chess. He is also passionate about reading fiction and traveling.

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Filed under Leadership, Operations & Innovation, Small Business

9 New Posts Today, 10.25.12 Small Business News to Use

HOME page highlights today include:
– global branding can be different — add this to your checklist.
– how many are aware of companies with golden parachutes still?
– Harvard Law gives us a guide to ADR offerings – good information.
– MS launched their new Windows 8 operating system – see review.
– 45 social media and marketing events from Mashable’s Event Board.
– financial now regulations – good review.
– plus even more in today’s posts — do explore!

Enjoy all!

Beverly

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Filed under Business Blog & Miscellaneous, Small Business

Looming “Fiscal Cliff” Speeds Mergers

Small business of-interest and need-to-know.

Excerpt:  With capital gains and dividend tax rates set to rise in 2013 barring congressional action, dealmakers are rushing to close merger and acquisition transactions by year-end. Acquirers, especially those in industries that are rapidly consolidating, say the impending changes to the tax code — the end of some business tax breaks and higher rates on capital gains and dividends — have lit a fire under business owners.

Owners of closely held businesses who would record a large individual gain from a sale, in particular, are eager to sell. And the threat to the U.S. economic outlook from the “fiscal cliff” is adding to the pressure.

Read full article fiscal cliff capital gains rate sellers Buffalo Wild Wings Airgas Waste Connections.  From CFO.com

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Filed under Small Business, Taxes & Audit

Traditional Marketing Planning Is Wrong for Your New Venture – HBR

Good read — however, for those with current startups and small businesses if you have not already realized this, you may just be LUCKY to be here.

 Excerpt:  Traditional marketing planning (TMP) activities have been a mainstay for the past four decades, but the theories behind them have limited relevance for new ventures facing extreme uncertainty. The old routine of analyzing existing markets, predicting an optimal outcome, and then designing marketing plans to capture that outcome is too slow and cumbersome for today’s startups.

To be successful, new ventures must eschew these theories and instead rely on effectual marketing planning. This strategy uses a different set of management processes focused on speedy action, learning through failure, and a premeditated approach to market experimentation that creates instant feedback. It can help new ventures be more successful, more informed, and more fully understood.

Read full article via Traditional Marketing Planning Is Wrong for Your New Venture – Peter Whalen and Samuel S. Holloway – Harvard Business Review.

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Filed under Entrepreneurs & Startups, Marketing, Branding, Sales, Advertising, eCommerce & Social Media, Small Business

Financial Stability Regulation — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

A somewhat detailed review of our current status with implemented changes.   Good read.  Small business of-interest.

Excerpt:  It may not always be the case that the most interesting time to be involved in a regulatory area is at its early stages, but I am reasonably certain it applies to the formation of a system for the regulation of systemic risk. From the standpoint of a regulator, the key challenge in these early stages is to be neither excessively self-confident about what we know about financial stability so as to produce unfortunate unintended consequences, nor excessively tentative so as to fail to take steps to counter the very real risks that do exist, in keeping with the aims stated by Congress. As I hope was apparent, that effort at balance informed my suggestions as to how we should apply the financial stability factor in our pre-merger reviews under the Bank Holding Company Act.

Read full article via Financial Stability Regulation — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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For Whom Golden Parachutes Shine — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance

They still exist and there are still those that believe them to be beneficial.  Personally, haven’t seen a company with one of these in a very long time.  What do you think?  Human resources management

Excerpt:  Golden parachutes, those packages that reward top executives if their company is acquired, have attracted much attention from investors and public officials for more than two decades. Defenders of golden parachutes believe that they provide executives with incentives to facilitate a sale of their companies. While the evidence confirms this, it indicates that golden parachutes have significant costs as well and might fail to serve the interests of shareholders over all.

Shareholder resolutions opposing golden parachutes have often received substantial support over time. Congress adopted tax rules aimed at discouraging large golden parachutes, and the rules created during the financial crisis precluded companies receiving government support from providing golden parachute payments to top executives. Subsequently, the Dodd-Frank Act mandated advisory shareholder votes on all future adoptions of golden parachutes.

Read full article via For Whom Golden Parachutes Shine — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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Filed under Human Resources & Payroll, Small Business