Tag Archives: Neuroscience

How Much Can Your Employees Get Away With? – HBR

A good read on one way neuroscience study for the leader and manager can help in understanding the behavior or others and making sure our communications are delivering the message we want to deliver.  Recommended for all leadership and management.

Excerpt:  ….. had figured out my “contingency maps”; they had figured out the unwritten if…then logic of my behavior. Regardless of what I said, every student knew what they could get away with and what work they were going to have to do. And this was independent of motivation, or of the power of my rewards and punishments. Some of them loved the work, while some of them didn’t want anything to do with school. But they all tended to not do what they could get away with not doing, in some way or another, that first semester. Now that I have studied neuroscience and psychology, I understand what was happening, and what to do about it.

Unbeknownst to the students, they were using the brains’ powerful ability to recognize patterns and adapt to them. As a leader who is aware of this aspect of brain function, you can learn when you are communicating the wrong message and how to communicate the right one; and thus elicit the employee behaviors and organizational culture you want.

Read full article via How Much Can Your Employees Get Away With? – Josh Davis – Harvard Business Review.

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This is Your Brain on Organizational Change – HBR

Good read and in my favorite topics, “why we do what we do”  and “why we are who we are”  🙂    In addition to the examples given in the artice, in my opinion there are many more examples over history.   Following every major shift in the economy, the same fail rate of giants becomes our history.  For all leadership and management with great small business takeaways

Excerpt:  One source of insight may be the field of neuroscience. The study of the brain, particularly within the field of social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience, is starting to provide some underlying insights that can be applied in the real world and, perhaps, increasingly to our understanding of how to better engage human performance and creativity during change.

At the NeuroLeadership Summit, being held in New York this week, a panel discussion with senior executives and experts from The Conference Board, the Association of Change Management Professionals, Change Leaders, and Barnard College will explore the connection between neuroscience and organizational change, understanding how we can effectively deal with the human resistance to change.

Read full article via This is Your Brain on Organizational Change – Walter McFarland – Harvard Business Review.

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For Social Media Buy-in, Lead with the “Why” – HBR

Good read and great advice.   Your campaigns, as we have been saying in many other posts in the past, need to use what science, namely neuroscience, can now show you is your customer’s motivators.  Marketing, advertising and sales.

Excerpt:  It’s been said that people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. So the goal is not to connect with people who want what you have; the goal is to connect with people who believe what you believe. This isn’t my opinion. It’s a powerfully proven fact based on the study of the human brain, which Simon Sinek explains here.

Traditional advertising and marketing leads with the what, such as, “We make desirable cars with great gas mileage.” Then it moves to the how, such as “We do this with great engineers and the best materials.” If you’re lucky, you may get a why at the end, but the why really usually boils down to, “We want to sell you a car.”

Now we have evidence — science! — that says you’ll get a better response by leading with the why.

Read full article via For Social Media Buy-in, Lead with the “Why” – Amy Jo Martin – Harvard Business Review.

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Economics and the Brain: How People Really Make Decisions in Turbulent Times

An article in one of my favorite topics, “why we are who we are” and “why we do what we do”   🙂   This article reviews findings of how we make decisions  —  the influences, etc.  Leadership and management training.

Excerpt:  “Whereas psychologists tend to view humans as fallible and sometime even self-destructive, economists tend to view people as efficient maximisers of self-interest who make mistakes only when imperfectly informed about the consequences of their actions.”

This view of humans as completely rational – and the market as eminently efficient – is relatively recent. In 1922, in the Journal of Political Economy, Rexford G. Tugwell, said (to paraphrase) that a mind evolved to function best in “the exhilarations and the fatigues of the hunt, the primitive warfare and in the precarious life of nomadism”, had been strangely and quickly transported into a different milieu, without much time to modify the equipment of the old life.

Read full article via Economics and the Brain: How People Really Make Decisions in Turbulent Times | Neuroscience News.

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Three Ways to Think Deeply at Work – HBR

Again, neuroscience is helping us as leaders and managers to accomplish our tasks and meet our many challenges.

Excerpt:  Most HBR readers can relate to a central dilemma of knowledge work today: We’re using rules for how we work in a factory in a time when most of our work product requires deep thinking.

A study of 6,000 people conducted by the NeuroLeadership Group in collaboration with a large healthcare firm asked respondents questions about where, when, and how people did their best thinking. Only 10 percent said it happened at work. At the NeuroLeadership Institute, we’ve been looking at ways to bring more of that deep thinking into the workplace. More specifically, we’ve been conducting research into what brain science shows us about how leaders think, develop, and perform, and recently we’ve been studying the role of the unconscious mind.

We’ve identified three particularly promising techniques, backed up by research, than can help you think more deeply:

Read full article via Three Ways to Think Deeply at Work – David Rock – Harvard Business Review.

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Leadership and Emotional Contagion

Another learning article for all leadership and management.   Emotions are as contagious as a virus in the workplace.  Therefore, learning to manage yours and others emotions are important leadership lessons.

Excerpt:  “Employees are not emotional islands. Rather, they continuously spread their own moods and receive and are influenced by others’ moods. When they work in groups, they literally can catch each others’ emotions like viruses, a phenomenon known as emotional contagion.” Wharton @ Work, University of Pennsylvania

In the past decade, there has been an important finding in neuroscience that should impact on how every leader leads – emotions are contagious.

One aspect of the research has been to examine the emotional impact of “bosses” on those who work for them – the power of mood to spread and “infect” others. “It is one of the most robust phenomena I have ever seen,” said University of New Hampshire researcher, Richard Saavedra, and it’s all unconscious.”

Read full article via Leadership and Emotional Contagion « The Intentional Workplace.

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Part 2 – Why Neuroscience SHOULD Change the Way We Manage People

Still skeptical that neuroscience is anything more than latest “fad” for leadership and management?   Then, this is a good read for you.  You can also access his “Part I” and then read the linked “Part II” below.

Excerpt:   What we now know about human development and optimal whole body-brain functioning should not only change the way we manage people at work – but how we raise and teach our children, provide health care, conduct our legal system and structure government policies and institutions.

Read full article  Part 2 – Why Neuroscience SHOULD Change the Way We Manage People.  From The Intentional Workplace

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New Statesman – Your Brain on Pseudoscience: The Rise of Popular Neurobollocks

Interesting read — author cites several examples and includes the warning of popular neuroscience in business can be nothing more than scams.  (In other words, we now are hearing from the other side).   I think there is a  truth in what he says, but from experience I am not ready to throw the “baby out with the bathwater”.   There is far too much documented success in the studies of “why we do what we do” and “why we are who we are” ,  and I have found this to be helpful in leadership, training and management.

Excerpt:  An intellectual pestilence is upon us. Shop shelves groan with books purporting to explain, through snazzy brain-imaging studies, not only how thoughts and emotions function, but how politics and religion work, and what the correct answers are to age-old philosophical controversies. The dazzling real achievements of brain research are routinely pressed into service for questions they were never designed to answer. This is the plague of neuroscientism – aka neurobabble, neurobollocks, or neurotrash – and it’s everywhere.

Read full article via New Statesman – Your brain on pseudoscience: the rise of popular neurobollocks.  From New Statesman

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Stress Breaks Loops that Hold Short-Term Memory Together

A lesson for the week:  don’t stress your staff before delivering that important training lesson!   “Why we do what we do” and “why we are who we are”.   🙂   For all leadership and management

Excerpt:  Stress has long been pegged as the enemy of attention, disrupting focus and doing substantial damage to working memory — the short-term juggling of information that allows us to do all the little things that make us productive.

Read full article via Stress Breaks Loops that Hold Short-Term Memory Together | Neuroscience News.

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The Neuroscience of Employee Engagement

Human resources management.  This sounds like a great free online webinar.  It is free on Sept 26th but you do need to register ahead of time.  Event

Excerpt introduction:  Management insights drawn from breakthoughs in cognitive science  Many studies show a link between high engagement and organizational success, yet until now our understanding of the science of engagement has mostly focused on outcome studies, not on the underlying mechanisms involved.

This session provides fresh insights into our understanding of what engagement is, how to measure it and most important, how to increase it. Drawing from the latest findings in neuroscience, we will explore a series of questions, such as:

What is the actual neural basis of engagement, in other words, what is engagement made up of, if you were to peer inside the brain?
What are the factors that drives engagement in the brain? How does engagement affect the brain? What are the various possible ‘levels’ of engagement?
And finally, how can we more accurately measure engagement?

What You Will Learn
Understand why your current engagement strategies do or don’t work
Discover fresh ideas for increasing engagement
Explore new thinking for measuring engagement
While attending this program is FREE, reservations are required.

Register here for Sept 26th event via The Neuroscience of Employee Engagement.

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Neuroscience | The Social Life of Brands

Good read and more in the evolving utilization and exploration of neuroscience to better our systems and thus metrics.

Excerpt: A marketing strategy informed by neuroscience can help companies enhance customer engagement — and make better use of tools like social media.

Read full article via The Social Life of Brands.  From Strategy + Business

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The Nature of Consciousness: How the Internet Could Learn to Feel

Okay, I admit I may be straying a bit from small business news to use, however, as most of you know, I find neuroscience and its business use evolution to be fascinating, especially for skills and learning in leadership and management.  What caught my eye on this one, “Are you saying the Internet could become conscious”  …….  whoa, is this a science fiction movie in the making?  No, at least not yet.   What he does —  sort of reminds me of one of my Logic classes many years ago —  is use the basic formula to prove his statement.  This is a Friday read if you have time or find such topics interesting.

Excerpt:
Are you saying the Internet could become conscious, or maybe already is conscious?

Koch:
That’s possible. It’s a working hypothesis that comes out of artificial intelligence. It doesn’t matter so much that you’re made out of neurons and bones and muscles. Obviously, if we lose neurons in a stroke or in a degenerative disease like Alzheimer’s, we lose consciousness. But in principle, what matters for consciousness is the fact that you have these incredibly complicated little machines, these little switching devices called nerve cells and synapses, and they’re wired together in amazingly complicated ways. The Internet now already has a couple of billion nodes. Each node is a computer. Each one of these computers contains a couple of billion transistors, so it is in principle possible that the complexity of the Internet is such that it feels like something to be conscious. I mean, that’s what it would be if the Internet as a whole has consciousness. Depending on the exact state of the transistors in the Internet, it might feel sad one day and happy another day, or whatever the equivalent is in Internet space.

Read full article  via The Nature of Consciousness: How the Internet Could Learn to Feel – Steve Paulson – The Atlantic.

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The Secret of Neuromarketing: Go for the Pain

As the line below reads, “something to wrap your marketing brain around”.    We are back to “why we do what we do” and “why we are who we are”.  🙂   For marketing management, understanding this and the tools neurosciences are giving you translates to your efforts will be rewarded by better targeting in the future.

 Excerpt:  There has also been much discussion lately about the rewiring that is happening to our brains because of our constant interaction with computers and smartphones. This interaction is further reducing our attention spans, which is pushing overworked and overcommitted American consumers to make purchasing and other decisions more quickly. The upshot is that people want information but they want it baby style — pureed to its most basic and served simply.

Something to wrap your marketing brain around.

Read full article via The Secret of Neuromarketing: Go for the Pain – NYTimes.com.

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13 Neuromarketing Lead Generation Tools

Using neuroscience to improve your sales and lead generation — a proven tool.   Just one of the uses (an important one) for “why we do what we do” and “why we are who we are” — a couple of my favorite topics for leadership and management, as most of you know.

Excerpt:  Human behaviour can be influenced by a whole range of common psychological quirks. Perception of scarcity, the herd effect, reciprocation and personalisation, all lend themselves to techniques for lead generation and marketing optimisation.

But what are these quirks of human nature and how are they actionable? In this post we’ve mapped the psychology to lead generation and marketing techniques, shining some light on why certain tactics work and to give you some inspiration!

Read full article via 13 Neuromarketing Lead Generation Tools.  From JumpLead

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The Social Life of Brands

Important read for all marketing and management.    It is MORE than just the today’s social media push.  It is the base concept of good marketing.  Check out the last line in the excerpt below.  As you know, if you visit the blog frequently, one of my favorite interests for leadership, management and also marketing is “why we do what we do AND why we are who we are”.   I am again urging everyone, if you have not gotten into these insights and learning, do so!

Excerpt: Some might attribute this trend — the increasing use of social engagement by marketers — to the rise of online social media: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, fan sites, and social marketing websites (also known as private-label media) created by companies themselves. But the trend represents a more fundamental change in marketing practice, linked to insights from social psychology, behavioral economics, and neuroscience and brain research

Read full article via The Social Life of Brands.  From Strategy + Business

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